Explore similar results starting at $25! View more
Add to Collection Add to Collection

Stock Footage

Autopsy Report, Broken Neck Still Leave Questions In Epstein Case -Forensi...

Digital Only License
$199
All Media License
$1199
License Options
1920x1080 @29.97fps / mp4 / 259.7MB / H.264
best price guarantee Best Price Guarantee

Found this item somewhere else at a lower price? We'll match it. More details here.

We are preparing your download. This process might take up to 2 minutes.
Add to Cart
Download
$199
Need custom pricing for your project?
Contact our team at +1 (855) 410-6789 or licenses@pond5.com

Description

By Reuters

Description:
NEW YORK, NEW YORK, UNITED STATES (AUGUST 15, 2019) (REUTERS) VARIOUS JOHN JAY COLLEGE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE FORENSIC SCIENCE PROFESSOR, OF DR. LAWRENCE KOBILINSKY, LOOKING AT MICROSCOPE IN LAB (SOUNDBITE) (English) JOHN JAY COLLEGE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE FORENSIC SCIENCE PROFESSOR, DR. LAWRENCE KOBILINSKY, SAYING: "Based on the autopsy, based on what we've learned surrounding his history, based upon what we've read about the damage to the neck, the hyoid bone, it's all consistent with suicide. It's less consistent with homicide." KOBILINSKY LOOKING IN MICROSCOPE (SOUNDBITE) (English) JOHN JAY COLLEGE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE FORENSIC SCIENCE PROFESSOR, DR. LAWRENCE KOBILINSKY, SAYING: "Now a lot of people look at the hyoid bone and base their conclusions on that, because in a manual strangulation the hyoid bone and the cricoid bone are often fractured. But in hangings, it's a different story. Most of the time the hyoid bone is intact. Most of the time. Most of the time, the thyroid cartilage is intact. The cricoid cartilage on the other hand is very seldom fractured. However, the problem with the hyoid bone is it's a very fragile structure. It consists of three separate bones during development, and over time as people get older, especially when they reach the age of about 40-years-old, those three bones are fused and they're one bone. But it's a fragile structure. So, hanging will break the hyoid bone not all the time, but roughly 20-25% of the time you will see a fractured hyoid bone. Does it necessarily point to a suicide? No. Does it point to a homicide? No, but it gives the medical examiner a little more information about exactly what the manner of death is." KOBILINSKY WALKING THROUGH LAB (SOUNDBITE) (English) JOHN JAY COLLEGE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE FORENSIC SCIENCE PROFESSOR, DR. LAWRENCE KOBILINSKY, SAYING: "Medical examiners, I like to say, they're really not scientists. They, they do medical arts and they use their experience and knowledge to come up with a conclusion. They're responsible for determining the cause of death which is a medical explanation, why did the person die, a manner of death, which tells you whether it was an accident, a homicide, a suicide, something of that sort. And of course if they can, the time of death. They can do those things fairly well but sometimes they get it wrong. And that's why you like to have another medical examiner present during the autopsy or after the autopsy to do an autopsy again or to look at the documentation of the first autopsy. You always want other eyes looking at it."
Dateline: 2019

Additional Information

Item ID:
114991161
Usage:
Editorial
Duration:
00:03:14
Looping:
No
Alpha Matte:
No
Advanced Licensing Options
Alpha Channel:
No
Model Released:
No
Property Released:
No
Location:
New York, New York, United States / Unidentified Location, Us
Average Bitrate:
11.2 Mbps
Bit Depth:
24
Audio Channels:
2
Audio Format:
mp4a
Audio Sample Rate:
48000

Keywords